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Greetings from the Axis of Evil
belarus_venezuela_vc.jpg
 “I brought you a greeting from the Axis of Evil,” ironized Chavez, who visited Cuba, Algiers, Libya, and Turkmenistan on his way to Belarus. None of these countries were actually included in the “Axis of Evil” coined by George W. Bush to describe Iran, Saddam Hussein's Iraq and North Korea. However, all countries Chavez visited on his trip have a roguish reputation in the West for their human rights violations, dictatorial tendencies, and widespread corruption. If Lukashenka takes up Chavez’s call to unite against “hegemonic” capitalism, one day some other political leader may enlist Minsk itself into the infamous Axis – jokingly or in earnest. This September is not the first time Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez visits his “favorite” country Belarus. This time he extolling Belarus as “a model social state like the one we [Venezuelans] are beginning to create.” No less enthusiastic, Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka praised the benefits of the likely “strategic partnership” between Minsk and Caracas and thanked Chavez for his “colossal support.” The presidents agreed not “to be deceived or exploited by anyone” and “defend the interests of the individual and not the hegemonic interests of the capitalists, wherever they may be, in Europe or Latin America.” Chavez went as far as flaunting the idea of “a new union of republics” incorporating Belarus and Venezuela. “This will not be a union of Soviet or socialist republics,” he clarified. “It will be free republics with their own systems, but united in a union.” Some may dismiss the presidents’ rhetoric as mere posturing. However, Belarus-Venezuela partnership could have far-reaching consequences, provided the marriage of Belarusian arms to Venezuelan oil lasts. Contemporary examples of such oil-for-arms arrangements include the US-Saudi Arabia partnership, in which American weaponry pays for Saudi oil, and China’s relationship with African oil-producers, in which Chinese arms pay for African crude.  “I brought you a greeting from the Axis of Evil,” ironized Chavez, who visited Cuba, Algiers, Libya, and Turkmenistan on his way to Belarus. None of these countries were actually included in the “Axis of Evil” coined by George W. Bush to describe Iran, Saddam Hussein's Iraq and North Korea. However, all countries Chavez visited on his trip have a roguish reputation in the West for their human rights violations, dictatorial tendencies, and widespread corruption. If Lukashenka takes up Chavez’s call to unite against “hegemonic” capitalism, one day some other political leader may enlist Minsk itself into the infamous Axis – jokingly or in earnest. This September is not the first time Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez visits his “favorite” country Belarus. This time he extolling Belarus as “a model social state like the one we [Venezuelans] are beginning to create.” No less enthusiastic, Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka praised the benefits of the likely “strategic partnership” between Minsk and Caracas and thanked Chavez for his “colossal support.” The presidents agreed not “to be deceived or exploited by anyone” and “defend the interests of the individual and not the hegemonic interests of the capitalists, wherever they may be, in Europe or Latin America.” Chavez went as far as flaunting the idea of “a new union of republics” incorporating Belarus and Venezuela. “This will not be a union of Soviet or socialist republics,” he clarified. “It will be free republics with their own systems, but united in a union.” Some may dismiss the presidents’ rhetoric as mere posturing. However, Belarus-Venezuela partnership could have far-reaching consequences, provided the marriage of Belarusian arms to Venezuelan oil lasts. Contemporary examples of such oil-for-arms arrangements include the US-Saudi Arabia partnership, in which American weaponry pays for Saudi oil, and China’s relationship with African oil-producers, in which Chinese arms pay for African crude.
4 September 2009
Underground Belarus Free Theatre Performs in Washington on September 15-16
Underground Belarus Free Theatre Performs in Washington on September 15-16

Washington, D.C. — The Georgetown University Theater and Performance Studies Program, in association with Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and in cooperation with the We Remember Civil Initiative, presents the internationally acclaimed Belarus Free Theatre at the Davis Performing Arts Center’s Devine Studio Theatre. Effectively banned in its home country, this underground troupe from Minsk, Belarus will perform the area premiere of “Generation Jeans” on Sept. 15, a freedom fighter’s semi-autobiographical monologue which details growing up as a member of the counterculture that regarded jeans and Western pop music as a symbol of rebellion. On Sept. 16, the company performs the U.S. premiere of “Discover Love,” based on the true story of Irina Krasovskaya, whose husband Anatoly, a businessman who supported the Belarus opposition movement, was kidnapped and murdered. The performance takes place exactly 10 years after Anatoly and Victor Gonchar, the Vice-Speaker of the Belarusian Parliament, disappeared on Sept. 16, 1999. Irina, who is now based in Washington, D.C., co-founded We Remember, a civil initiative that disseminates information about politically motivated disappearances of Belarusian citizens and informs the world community about the situation. A memorial reception organized by Irina Krasovskya follows the Sept. 16 premiere.

4 September 2009
Belarusian Nuclear Power Project: Dangerous and Expensive

On September 2nd, Belarus moved one step closer to building its first nuclear reactor by signing an agreement with Russia’s AtomStroyExport for constructing a nuclear power plant in Astravets, Hrodna region. The launch of the first nuclear plant unit is scheduled for 2016 and the second – for 2018.

2 September 2009
Google Translate: Belarusian Language
Google Translate: Belarusian Language

The US Internet giant Google now offers a free translation service from and into Belarusian. If you come across a text in Belarusian language and would like to translate it into English - simply go to Google Translate.

28 August 2009
The IMF Asks the Belarus Government to Weaken its Grip over the Economy

WASHINGTON – Having concluded another round of consultations with Belarus authorities, the International Monetary Fund urges the Government to sell state assets, curb lending and raise utility prices to cope with the most serious economic crises in more than a decade.

24 August 2009
American Councils Program for Individualized Instruction in Belarusian Language
American Councils Program for Individualized Instruction in Belarusian Language

The American Councils Eurasian Regional Language program provides support for intensive individualized instruction in the languages of Eurasia, including Belarusian. Participants from the United States may in enroll in semester, academic year, or summer programs. All courses are conducted by expert faculty from leading local universities and educational institutions. Participants may select semester, academic year, or summer programs. The semester program provides approximately 14 weeks of study; the academic year program provides approximately 28 weeks (two semesters), and the summer program provides a minimum of 7 weeks.

22 August 2009
Internet Guru Evgeny Morozov Moves to Georgetown as a Yahoo! Fellow
Internet Guru Evgeny Morozov Moves to Georgetown as a Yahoo! Fellow

Evgeny Morozov became a Yahoo! Fellow at Georgetown University for 2009-2010. A national of Belarus, Evgeny was a fellow of Open Society Institute in New York before moving to Washington. He publishes and speaks widely on of the impact of Internet and social media on democracy. He also runs net.effect blog with Foreign Policy magazine.

17 August 2009
What Washington and Minsk Have to Talk About
What Washington and Minsk Have to Talk About

On Friday, Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Phillip Gordon listened more than he talked. Perhaps because he was not graced with the presence of the chief Belarusian orator, President Alyaksandr Lukashenka. Most likely, however, because Washington doesn’t have much to talk about until Minsk lifts restrictions on the political opposition, allows independent media and NGOs to develop and takes other measures to improve its human rights record. Gordon first talked with the representatives of the Belarusian opposition. Alyaksandr Kazulin, Siargei Kaliakin, Anatol Liaukovich, Anatol Liabedzka, Vincuk Viachorka, Viktar Karniaenka, Vital Rymasheuski, Valiancin Stefanovich, and Mihail Pashkevich briefed Gordon on the political situation in the country prior to his meeting with the presidential chief of staff and foreign minister. According to the Foreign Ministry’s terse account, “The sides discussed the development of Belarus-US relations, in particular taking advantage of the existing opportunities to expand the trade and economic cooperation and interaction in international security sphere.” According to the US Embassy, “During discussions with Belarusian government officials, he (Gordon) stressed the U.S. desire to continue to engage Belarus in a mutual effort to improve bilateral relations.”

13 August 2009
Excerpts of video of Meeting between U.S. Congressional delegation and Lukashenka, June 30, 2009
Excerpts of video of Meeting between U.S. Congressional delegation and Lukashenka, June 30, 2009

PDFPrinthttps://belarusdigest.com/story/excerpts-of-video-of-meeting-between-u-s-congressional-delegation-and-lukashenka-june-30-2009/

11 August 2009
Phillip Gordon to visit Belarus on Friday
Phillip Gordon to visit Belarus on Friday

As the proverb goes, guests bring joy twice: when they come and when they go. The increasing frequency of Western visitors to the Belarusian capital is a positive sign that its isolation is coming to an end, but Alyaksandr Lukashenka surely sighs with relief when the outsiders leave. Luckily, Western officials never stay for long; they drop by Minsk on their way to states with larger arsenals and oil resources. Of course, some were forced to prolong their visit – like Emanuel Zeltser, a US lawyer charged with industrial espionage. Those are important because their fellow countrymen usually come to the rescue. Others were impelled to depart sooner than they expected, like the staff of the US embassy in Minsk. This Friday, the Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Phillip Gordon plans to meet top government officials as well as the opposition leaders during his one-day trip to the Belarusian capital. He will be the highest US official to visit Minsk since US Ambassador Karen Stewart’s forced departure in March 2008. The way for Gordon was paved by the earlier visits of EU Foreign Policy chief Javier Solana (February 2009) and a US congressional delegation (June 2009). A Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, in Washington, DC, Gordon was appointed to replace Assistant Secretary Daniel Fried.

8 August 2009
Two Letters to Obama with One Subject: Russia
Two Letters to Obama with One Subject: Russia

Last July, a number of European leaders, signed an open letter to Obama urging a more active and principle-driven role of the United States in Europe. Vaclav Havel, Lech Valensa and other former European presidents were worried about what they called the Russia’s creeping intimidation and influence-peddling in the region. Recalling the “realism” of Yalta conference which divided Europe for decades, the authors praised the US role during the Cold War and in opening the doors of NATO. In their opinion, role of the United States was crucial in NATO enlargement and the realization of the idea of united and free Europe at peace. The European leaders called for renaissance and strengthening of the role of NATO, creation of a special program for young leaders, relaxation of the U.S. visa regime and promotion of Europe’s energy independence from Russia. This week a similar letter was written from Belarus. Stanislau Shushkevich, the first Head of State of Belarus, and Ivonka Survila, President of the Rada of Belarus Democratic Republic-in-Exile, expressed concerns about Russia’s economic and political pressure in their letter to President Obama. The authors called the United States to create an initiative similar to EU’s Eastern Partnership, which would include the countries of the former Soviet Union into transatlantic cooperation.

5 August 2009
When Diplomacy Becomes Non Grata

“I think Senator Gramm would be in serious consideration for ambassador to Belarus, although I’m not sure the citizens of Minsk would welcome that.” John McCain

27 July 2009
Looking for ‘happiness on a different part of the planet’
Looking for ‘happiness on a different part of the planet’

“[N]o one nation can meet the challenges of the 21st century on its own,” acknowledged the president of the United States Barack Obama in his speech to Chinese officials today. Uncharacteristically, his Belarusian counterpart seems to agree, at least in principle. Despite its advantageous geopolitical location between the West and Russia, Belarus resigned itself to political isolation in the late 1990s. However, the change is in the air. Hockey ace Alyaksandr Lukashenka has started aiming at a different net and hopes to join the rest of Eastern European team in cooperating with the West. The Belarusian President has even promised to restore mutual diplomatic presence with the United States, if Washington lifts economic sanctions. The leader hurried to explain that his civilized tone with the West is not a result of some “bargaining, over-compromising or PR.” Indeed, it would be hard to reach a compromise with President Lukashenka. However, Lukashenka has implemented a few liberal reforms, released most of political prisoners, and markedly loosened control of the economy. To be sure, Lukashenka clarified that Belarus “has its own way forwards” and will not develop “according to one stereotype, to somebody’s dictation.” In presidential lingo, this probably means that Lukashenka’s authoritarian leadership style and human rights violations will continue. After all, in his view, “Belarus doesn’t have less democracy than its neighbors.”   In return to Lukashenka’s overtures to the West, the EU lifted the travel ban on the President and his retinue last fall. This May, Belarus – along with other five former Soviet republics – was invited to participate in the Eastern Partnership, a project intended to foster closer economic and political ties with the EU. Moreover, Minsk has collected a $1.5 billion from the International Monetary Fund and is waiting for another $1.36 billion from the IMF and $200 million from the World Bank. Since Lukashenka’s gaze turned westward, the “union state” with Moscow has become “a neverending construction project.” Increasingly more “controversial matters” are emerging “in relations with brotherly Russia,” as the Belarusian President noted. On July 22, Belarus urged its citizens to obey Georgian laws when traveling to Abkhazia and South Ossetia. While Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Grigory Karasin called Lukashenka’s move “bizarre,” his behavior is actually becoming more predictable as it now corresponds to a broader trend exhibited by leaders of most post-Soviet states, including Ukraine and Georgia. Russia’s economy is sinking, and it is smarter to sail away and look for happiness on a different part of the planet, as Lukashenka himself aptly noted in May. Had it not been for Moscow’s generous gas subsidies and the need to sell Belarusian goods on the Russian markets, the Belarusian-Russian symbiosis would have ended even sooner. “It’s a very difficult thing to deal with, loss of empire,” US Vice President Joe Biden noted in the interview at the end of a four-day trip to Ukraine and Georgia. His ‘condolences’ have come at the right time. Russia’s influence in Near Abroad has weakened as the country struggles domestically. On the one hand, giving (subsidizing) is no longer tenable in the dire economic situation; on the other, strong-arming its neighbors now brings too little bang for the buck. In fact, flexing its muscles in the Near Abroad has only backfired. The EU was spurred to start a new pipeline through Turkey and southern Europe to bypass mercurial Moscow. The United States neither canceled its missile defense plans in Europe nor backed down from supporting Georgia and Ukraine. Even Belarus failed to follow the suit of Nicaragua by recognizing the breakaway Georgian provinces.

26 July 2009
Flooded Streets of Minsk – 24 July, 2009
Flooded Streets of Minsk – 24 July, 2009

PDFPrinthttps://belarusdigest.com/story/flooded-streets-of-minsk-24-july-2009/

24 July 2009
У Менску адбыўся з’езд “Бацькаўшчыны”
У Менску адбыўся з’езд “Бацькаўшчыны”